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NASA Invites Stakeholders to STMD’s LIFT-1 Industry Forum


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Artist concept of an In-situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) demonstration on the Moon. Many technologies in six priority areas encompassed by NASA’s Lunar Surface Innovation Initiative will need testing, such as advancing ISRU technologies that could lead to future production of fuel, water, or oxygen from local materials, expanding exploration capabilities.
Artist concept of an In-situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) demonstration on the Moon. Many technologies in six priority areas encompassed by NASA’s Lunar Surface Innovation Initiative will need testing, such as advancing ISRU technologies that could lead to future production of fuel, water, or oxygen from local materials, expanding exploration capabilities.
NASA

NASA is hosting a virtual industry forum on Nov. 13, 2023, to introduce the agency’s Lunar Infrastructure Foundational Technologies (LIFT-1) demonstration Request for Information (RFI). At this event, representatives of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) will discuss the relevant Moon-to-Mars Objectives, STMD Envisioned Future Priorities (EFPs), and will answer questions from potential respondents interested in the RFI. Written responses to the Q&A will be posted to NSPIRES after the meeting. 

Although the primary focus for this activity is a future lunar surface resource utilization (ISRU) demonstration it will require multiple capabilities that may address other infrastructure objectives. The Industry Day offers an opportunity for respondents to gain insight and understanding of the ISRU objectives as well as those other foundational infrastructure objectives.

LIFT-1 REQUEST FOR INFORMATION INDUSTRY FORUM (virtual)  

Monday, Nov. 13, 2023 

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. EST 

Speakers: 

  • Niki Werkheiser, director of Technology Maturation, NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters     
  • Jerry Sanders, lead for NASA’s In-Space Resource Utilization (ISRU), NASA Capability Leadership Team (CLT) (multiple NASA centers)  
  • Mike Ching, technical advisor, NASA’s Lunar Surface Innovation Initiative (LSII); Space Technology Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters     

Platform: The Industry Forum will be conducted via the Webex application. To connect to the industry forum Webex meeting, participants must first register. Once registered, participants will receive a meeting invitation to the registered email address with options to join via Webex or audio only (phone). 

MORE INFORMATION 

The LIFT-1 RFI is available on NSPIRES and open for responses through December 18, 2023 (5:00 p.m. EST)


Please direct questions related to the RFI and industry day by email to: HQ-STMD-LIFT-1-RFI@nasaprs.com 

For media inquiries, please contact Jimi Russell, james.j.russell@nasa.gov.

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